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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
of murdering a mother and her children. these are the last images of jennifer hawke-petit it alive. this newly released bank surveillance video ticks off the final moments of a horrific crime. petit withdraws $15,000, nervously explaining to the teller she and her family are being held hostage and the money is for ransom. a bank manager called 911. >> we have a lady who is in our bank right now, who says that her husband and children are being held at their house. she is petrified. >> reporter: petit got the money and left the bank at 9:22. >> they told us they wouldn't hurt anybody if she got back there with the money. she believed them. >> reporter: at 9:26 police in unmarked cars to the petits' house. officers are told to block off the street but not to approach. almost 30 minutes later, at 9:54, a badly injured william petit manages to escape to a neighbor's house and a second 911 call is made. >> i got bill petit here, who's hurt, my neighbor. >> he's at your house? >> yes, he's right here. >> reporter: then suspects steven hayes and joshua komisarjevsky allegedly set the house o on fire
's jennifer davis is on the cape tonight. >> reporter: even as earl continues to lose its strength, massachusetts governor says his state is preparing for a very serious storm. >> we've had them before and we'll have them again. >> reporter: after whipping the north carolina coastline with heavy wind and rain earl may be weakening at a quicker pace than expected. warnings are in effect around cape cod as well as a popular summer vacation island spot of martha's vineyard and nantucket. >> we'll go out to a shelter that's been set up at the high school and assist them with snacks and drinks until we know exactly what's going to happen with the storm. >> reporter: the national hurricane center says most of earl's strong winds are expected to stay off cape cod. that's good news for those in the area. >> it can't be a big deal when i see all these other people out here. >> i mean if things happen, there's plenty of places. so i think we'll be okay. >> reporter: despite the impending storm shops and restaurants were pretty busy with tourists. >> we're staying. >> reporter: any concerns?
in the u.s. our dr. jennifer ashton is here. it's dig gusting. they found out that test, one out of seven wouldn't pass the test, that's conservative. >> this is precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are a significant number of food-borne illnesses in the country have year resulting in about 325,000 hospitalizations the cdc estimates and about 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. >> it's serious. probably a number go unreported so the numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolutely. >> so, what is it? where are the germiest, grimiest, bacteria-laden spots we need to clean up? >> basically anywhere you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator to the stove handles. everywhere. but these are really the biggest hot spots. they start really with what we use to clean our kitchens, which are sponges. >> this -- i can just say, this is a plea to everyone at home. if you're ever in my kitchen,
of foodborne disease we see every year. jennifer ashton is here with more. disgust. one out of seven kitchens wouldn't pass the test. that was conservative, they said. it is probably worse in reality. >> precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are number of foodborne illnesses every year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. this is not an insignificant issue. >> it is ear just. actually a number of them also go unreported. numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolute. >> i what is it? where's the germiest, grimeiest, most bacteria laden spots in the kitchen we need to clean up? >> anywhere that you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator and to the stove handles and everywhere. but these are really the biggest hotspots and start really with what we use to clean our kitchen which is are sponge. >> can i just say this is a plea to everyone, don't u
, for sure. and i'll miss her. >> reporter: for 18-year-old jennifer wang's parents, it's going to be tough. >> i think it's time for myself to be independent. >> reporter: on move-in day at the university of minnesota, the separation anxiety is just as hard, if not harder on the parents. you're allowed to cry a little bit, right? >> i cried already. >> reporter: here and at colleges around the country, grinell in iowa, moorhouse in georgia, princeton and others, colleges are trying to help by gently nudging the parents out. >> we're encouraging them to help the student move in, get settled and then it's time to spend good-bye. >> special programs and lectures for parents on one side of the campus while new students are free to meet up with friends across the quad. speaking honestly, there's been a bit of separation anxiety in my own household. this week, i shipped off my own two kids. and it was pandemonium, but my son had this message for his micromanaging parents. >> mom, dad, it's time to let go. >> reporter: i'm not ready to let go. >> you do still have a very important part in your st
with here in the city. >> reporter: jennifer coffee said habitat is looking for 30 first-time home buyers. she said they won't be able to build unless they have a family. >> needing 30 families means that we're putting some homes on hold a little bit. >> reporter: in order to be eligible for a habitat home families have to meet the qualifications. coffee says the biggest hang-up? families' fear of taking on a mortgage. >> if a person is paying more than $400 in rent, they're throwing their money away. >> reporter: but coffee said a few habitat homes have gone into foreclosure, leaving them vacant. >> there is a mortgage payment that these families have to pay. the average is $350. so if, if they don't pay the $350, then unfortunately they can't stay. >> reporter: habitat said they hope it sends a message to low-income families, if they want a home, now is the time. >> all right. let's get you to the daily briefing. the white house davely briefing. white house spokesman robert gibbs offering comments on hurricane earl. >> we will let you know when that happens. yes, ma'am? >> do you have a
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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